A Little Java a Few Patterns Matthias Felleisen and Daniel Friedman use a small subset of Java to introduce pattern directed program design With their usual clarity and flair they gently guide readers through the fundamentals of

  • Title: A Little Java, a Few Patterns
  • Author: Matthias Felleisen Daniel P. Friedman
  • ISBN: 9780262561150
  • Page: 316
  • Format: Paperback
  • Matthias Felleisen and Daniel Friedman use a small subset of Java to introduce pattern directed program design With their usual clarity and flair, they gently guide readers through the fundamentals of object oriented programming and pattern based design Readers new to programming, as well as those with some background, will enjoy their learning experience as they work thMatthias Felleisen and Daniel Friedman use a small subset of Java to introduce pattern directed program design With their usual clarity and flair, they gently guide readers through the fundamentals of object oriented programming and pattern based design Readers new to programming, as well as those with some background, will enjoy their learning experience as they work their way through Felleisen and Friedman s lessons.

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      316 Matthias Felleisen Daniel P. Friedman
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      Posted by:Matthias Felleisen Daniel P. Friedman
      Published :2020-01-15T04:19:06+00:00

    About “Matthias Felleisen Daniel P. Friedman

    1. Matthias Felleisen Daniel P. Friedman says:

      Matthias Felleisen Daniel P. Friedman Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the A Little Java, a Few Patterns book, this is one of the most wanted Matthias Felleisen Daniel P. Friedman author readers around the world.



    2 thoughts on “A Little Java, a Few Patterns

    1. I liked The Little Schemer, so I decided to give this a try. It was not worth it. It is fine that the book has nothing to do with real world Java, but it does a poor job of explaining too few patterns in a awkward style. While it was extremely cute in the Scheme books of the series, but it just does not work here.Furthermore the code shown is so far removed from what Java code looks like, that it will take you a while to get it.Probably the only thing worth it is list of recommended books at the [...]

    2. Not as good as Little/Seasoned/etc Schemer, but still interesting.The weirdest thing is probably that all examples are in Java, but at the same time, they aren't due to the usage of the superscripts and some mathematical symbols. Given the fact that they had to do some extreme name shortening to fit the source code into narrow columns I'd probably consider ditching the Java syntax and use more pseudo-code style since it will be very easy to translate to the actual Java code, but it will be more [...]

    3. read this a really long time back. no longer useful for java (to the degree it ever was), but people new to functional programming can still quickly pick up some ideas from it. Would rather recommend The Little MLer for that purposse though

    4. First a bit on the Kindle version:One star is subtracted for the electronic conversion. I fully understand that they needed a fixed layout and font-size in order to keep the original two-column layout work with the code examples without overflowing, but this comes at the cost of losing all the benefits of the layout that Kindle provides. The font also looks a bit weird - possibly a pdf->mobi conversion with OCR. Reading on my regular Kindle is taxing, but it is ok. The screen size of the Kind [...]

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